Tag Archives: cars

Cars that never made it to production

Technology is one of the products of science, along with knowledge and understanding; so I include technology under the heading of “science stuff. The cars on this page represent the technology of the 1950s.
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My first car was a silver 1947 Dodge that I paid $65.00 cash for. I was driving a green ’56 Ford when I got married the first time. After a while, I traded it for a black ’59 Ford convertible. The only convertible I ever had or wanted. Neither of my Fords looked much like the ones here.
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The ’50s were the last decade that cars were so distinctive you could see a 6-inch square almost anywhere on any car and easily identify the make and model. It was in the ’60s that they started cutting out cars with cookie cutters. They’ve all looked pretty much alike ever since.
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They were pure fantasy on wheels, machines designed to make the heart race and the mind ask, “What if?”
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These 1950’s concept cars were automotive art built to attract public attention, test wild engineering ideas and give motorists a fleeting glimpse down the highway of tomorrow.
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Here are the cars from the ’50s

While it’s not always obvious because of the spacing, each car is identified below its picture. The light blue “Jetson’s” convertible at the bottom was not identified in the list I received.
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1957 CHRYSLER DIABLO

1956 BUICK CENTURION II

1954 FORD LA TOSCA

1951 BUICK Le SABRE

1959 GM FIREBIRD III

1955 LINCOLN FUTURA

1951 BUICK XP-300

1955 FORD MYSTERE

1959 CADILLAC CYCLONE

1954 OLDSMOBILE ROCKET F 88

1958 FORD X-2000

1953 CADILLAC GHIA COUPE

1955 LINCOLN INDIANAPOLIS

195? MERCURY D 524 
This car was never shown to the public.

1952 CHRYSLER D’ ELEGANCE

1954 DE SOTO ADVENTURER II

1953 FORD X-100

1956 PACKARD PREDICTOR

1956 OLDSMOBILE GOLDEN ROCKET

1956 Pontiac Club de Mer.

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Source: From an email list circulating the internet.

Full Disclosure: I have not attempted to verify the makes and models of these cars, but I can vividly remember the distinctive styles on the roads when I was a young man. These particular models are said to have “never made it to production.” The ones on the highways were not too different, though a little less flamboyant, I suppose.

In case you wonder, my first car was a gray 1947 Dodge that looked about like this one, except mine didn’t have the skylight. I paid $65.00 cash for it (borrowed from my Uncle Jim) in late 1959, while everybody else was driving those fancy cars with all the fins and fabulous grills and other decorations. It was definitely NOT often referred to as a “chick magnet.”

1947 Dodge photoPhoto by dok1

After seeing the others, do you wonder why whoever took this picture was so ashamed of his plain looking old car that he tried to hide it behind a tree?

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